Texas: then and now

This week in the Hill Country

Celebrate Bandera

Date: through .
Time: All Day Event
Location: Downtown Bandera
Category: Kids / Family

Longhorn Cattle Drive and Parade, arts and crafts, music Re-enactments on the Medina River, Intertribal Pow Wow, National Professional Bull Riders Challenge…
 

 

 

 

Yesterday’s news

1831: Rebecca Jane Gilleland Fisher was born in Philadelphia. The family moved to Texas in 1837, settling in Refugio County. They were attacked by Comanches, who killed all but Rebecca and her brother, whom they captured. Rebecca was rescued and sent to live with an aunt in Galveston. She went to Rutersville College from about 1845 to 1848, married Orceneth Fisher [whatever did she call him?], had six children, spent 16 years in California and Oregon, and finally moved back to Austin. Rebecca was a charter member of the Daughters of the Texas Revolution. She was the only woman elected to the Texas Veterans Association and was its last surviving member. Her portrait was the first of a woman to be hung in the Senate chamber at the Capitol. She died in Austin on March 21, 1926

2004: Laura Hernández Cantú, who with her sister formed the Tejana singing duet of Carmen y Laura, was born on May 25, 1926, in Kingsville, Texas. Beginning with the duet’s first recording in the 1940s, “Se Me Fue Mi Amor” (“My Love Went Away”), Cantú went on to have a highly-regarded career as a performer of the Tejano musical tradition of polkas, rancheras, and cumbias. Laura and Carmen were some of the first Tejanas to include swing, blues, beguines, and foxtrots in their playlist. She was recognized by the Conjunto Music Hall of Fame in San Antonio, the Texas Music Museum Hall of Fame in Austin, and by the Smithsonian Institution’s Folkways Recordings. The documentary film, Accordion Dreams (2001), also paid tribute to her work.She died August 29th, 2004, in Alice, Texas and the next day a rosary was said for her.

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