Texas now and then

This week in the Hill Country

Obra Gráfica: Selections from the Mexic-Arte Museum Print Collection January 22 – May 29

The Museum is also proud to care for the Taller de Gráfica Popular Collection, which was a cooperative printmaking workshop and includes over 300 prints (etchings, linocuts, lithographs, and silkscreens) dating between 1940 and 1970. Throughout the exhibit will be prints from past Young Latino Artists, Changarrito Project Residencies, various contemporary zines, and prints acquired by the Mexic-Arte Museum from Flatstock (American Poster Institute). Image: Julia Arredondo. Call Me. 2014. Collage and screenprint. 10.5” x 8”.

 

Austin Opera presents Of Mice and Men, every 3 days through Jan 29.

Carlisle Floyd’s operatic rendition of John Steinbeck’s iconic novella.

Yesterday’s news

1822    Emil von Kriewitz de Czepry, adventurer, soldier, and settler, was born on January 18, 1822, in the Thüringen district of Germany near Potsdam. He emigrated to Texas in 1845 and arrived in Galveston in February, 1846. He and 80 other young men there volunteered for service in the U.S. Army and were mustered into service as Company H, First Texas Rifle Volunteers. The climate in Matamoros was so dreadful, most of the men were discharged.

Kriewitz moved on to Fredericksburg and got involved in treaty negotiations with the Comanches. They requested that a German live at their camp to serve as a mediator of trade and further the understanding between the two peoples. Kriewitz volunteered, moving to the camp of Chief Santa Anna, bringing bags of sugar and coffee as gifts. He adopted their dress and behavior and became a friend of Santa Anna. In 1847, the chief decided more gifts were due, so they all traveled to New Braunfels. They didn’t trust Kriewitz here, and kept him a prisoner, allowing him to speak to no one. To make matters worse, he had so completely assumed the appearance of the Indians that he could not at first be told apart from the others in the party. Finally he was recognized and made secret contact with another German colonist. After some further adventures, he went to visit another German friend, but when he returned, the Comanches had moved on without him. Oh, well.

Kriewitz switched to building roads and leading new colonists to the Fisher-Miller Land Grant. The first party was a group of scholars and artisans who founded the communal colony of Bettina in September 1847. In 1852 he opened a store in Castell. In 1854, he married Amelia Markwordt. They had eight children. He was postmaster of Castell from 1876 to 1883. He continued to ranch and speculate in real estate until his death on May 21, 1902, in Castell. He is buried in the Llano County Cemetery, Llano. You might call that a full life.

 

1938    Charles Curtis Flood, three-time All-Star Major League Baseball centerfielder and labor rights advocate, was born in Houston, Texas. Flood became a ballplayer, going on to play twelve seasons with the Cardinals in which he earned some of baseball’s most prestigious honors. While Flood acquired an impressive MLB record, it was his departure from sports and his contribution to the free-agency movement that left an indelible mark on the league. In 1969 Flood was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies against his will. While it was common-place (and legal) for a player to be traded without regard to their wishes under baseball’s reserve clause, Flood decided to fight the decision and sue MLB for violating the Thirteenth Amendment and antitrust laws. The landmark case Flood v. Kuhn made it all the way to the United States Supreme Court, which ruled 5 to 3 against Flood. Although he did not win his case, his decision to take a stand influenced other ballplayers to unify in an effort to challenge MLB for more rights in the trading process. The product of that subsequent movement ushered in the free agency era that exists today.

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