Maps for the Francis Bacon series

Maps for the Francis Bacon series

London

The best sixteenth-century map of London is the woodcut map created by Ralph Agas in the 1560s. London grew a lot by 1586, when Murder by Misrule is set, but this gives you the best overall view.

Download a high resolution jpg of the Agas map.

Cool interactive tool for playing with the Agas map, from the Museum of London.

Here’s a great map of Elizabethan London from Luminarium. I wasn’t able to find out who made this adaptation, but the original map, showing the theaters in and around London in Elizabeth’s time, as this attribution: “Author: Joseph Quincy Adams. Image credit C. W. Redwood, formerly technical artist at Cornell University.” Here’s a page-sized printable pdf. elizlondon_200dpi_7-5×10

 

 

A page-size, printable map of the western periphery, from Whitehall to the western city wall. I made this myself, by tracing the Agas map. west_london4.pdf

 

Cambridge

This map was made in 1575, pretty close to my 1587 Death by Disputation. It’s public domain, so you can follow the link to get a higher resolution version from Wikimedia Commons. Be mindful that north is on the left!! I use the biggest version I can get and zoom in to study places in detail. I also spent an absurd amount of time going from a Google map of contemporary Cambridgeshire to the articles about each town in British History Online. Most of the towns that are there now, were there then. Tom would have gone up the road at the top, heading east, to get to Babraham. Corpus Christi College is labelled Benett Coll., its old nickname. It’s the thick green square just above the High Street (the main street running horizontally), on a line running up from the left shoulder of the man in white.